Suzuki Foundation

We are One Nature

David Suzuki Foundation

We are One Nature

David Suzuki Foundation

The story of the David Suzuki Foundation begins in 1989, when David Suzuki’s award-winning CBC radio series It’s a Matter of Survival sounded a worldwide alarm. Scientists had proven that human beings were having a larger — and more detrimental — impact on the Earth than any other species in history. It became clear that we needed to change the way we were living, consuming and thinking about our natural world.

More than 17,000 shocked listeners wrote letters to David Suzuki asking for ways to avert the impending environmental catastrophe. A movement was born.

The roots of our Foundation stem from this single, transformational paradigm shift: that respect for nature and interdependence with it must be our species’ top priority.

Following the radio series and the public reaction to it, David Suzuki and Tara Cullis hosted a gathering of a dozen thought leaders and activists on Pender Island, B.C., in November 1989. The group identified the need for a new solutions-based organization to tackle the environmental crisis. On September 14, 1990, the David Suzuki Foundation was incorporated.

Suzuki Foundation

David Suzuki has written or co-authored more than 50 books, nearly 20 of which are for children! Award-winning geneticist and broadcaster David Suzuki co-founded the David Suzuki Foundation in 1990. In 1975, he helped launch and host the long-running CBC Radio’s, Quirks and Quarks. In 1979, he became familiar to audiences around the world as host of CBC TV’s The Nature of Things, which still airs new episodes.

From 1969 to 2001, he was a faculty member at the University of British Columbia, and is currently professor emeritus. He is widely recognized as a world leader in sustainable ecology and has received numerous awards for his work, including a UNESCO prize for science and a United Nations Environment Program medal. He is also a Companion of the Order of Canada.

He has 29 honorary degrees from universities in Canada, the US and Australia. For his support of Canada’s Indigenous peoples, Suzuki has been honoured with eight names and formal adoption by two First Nations.

In 2010, the National Film Board of Canada and Legacy Lecture Productions produced Force of Nature: The David Suzuki Movie, which won a People’s Choice documentary award at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival. The film weaves together scenes from the places and events that shaped Suzuki’s life and career with a filming of his “Last Lecture”, which he describes as “a distillation of my life and thoughts, my legacy, what I want to say before I die.”

Ivo Valkenburg

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